Great and/or Important military photographs taken by military photographers

Gallery

This gallery contains 23 photos.

A purely subjective collection of images that celebrate the military photographer to which, from time to time I will add other images of my own choosing.  If you have an image that you think qualifies then send it to me … Continue reading

I could have been Mr. Universe.

I was a skinny kid. You wouldn’t believe it if you saw me today. But I was  real skinny, a proper seven stone weakling. I was forever getting sand kicked in my face. Even in kindergarten, in the sand pit, the other kids would kick sand in my face. And when we lived in Blackpool, well you can guess what happened on the beach. It was the same at Southend on Sea, and Skegness. We lived in Libya for a bit, it was painful in Libya.

Got to the stage I avoided sand, avoided going to the beach. It was too traumatic. Reckon I was suffering from Post Traumatic Sand in the Face Disorder.

When I was about 13 or 14, I saw this advertisement, probably on the back page of one of my comics, or maybe in the Reader’s Digest, but wherever, it seemed to me to be the answer to all my traumas. I clipped the coupon and sent off for the Charles Atlas bodybuilding course. Many a youth did the same, thousands in fact. . Me and Arnold Schwarzenegger for example, who was about the same age as me, and probably clipped the same coupon in the same comic, although, to be fair, he probably took it a bit more seriously than did I.

But the course cost something like Twelve guineas and I didn’t have 12 guineas. I was as weak in the pocket as I was in the body. Of course, these advertisements played upon and exploited all the inadequacies and lack of confidence so common amongst teenage boys, and they knew that somehow such teenagers would find the money, without telling their parents, and take up the offer. So it was that after some diligent saving which included searching for and gathering empty bottles and collecting the 3d refunds thereon, I raised the money. Only by that time it had gone up to 15 guineas.

Charles Atlas claimed that he himself had been a “scrawny weakling” before he discovered the secret of “dynamic tension” and “isotonic exercise”. I never fully understood dynamic tension. Or isotonic exercise. It involved putting your muscles under some stress, pretending to push a wall down, for example, or lifting a stick with pretend weights on it. In fact, I was pretty good at lifting a stick with pretend weights on it. Was a bit disappointed I did not quite develop a Mr. Universe physique by lifting such a stick. I ought to have checked with Arnold Schwarzenegger to see what kind so sticks he was using.

The course was supposed to last about 30 days and there was a money back guarantee. I suspect the guarantee was a bit of a scam. The course did not work for me. I was still getting and kicked in my face after 28 days and I reckon that if I had asked for my money back I would have been told to “Piss off!  year weakling punk, ask for yer money again and I’ll come round and kick sand in your face” Consumer protection laws were not very strong in those days. Yeah, it was probably a scam.

There were other entrepreneurs exploiting teenage boys feelings of angst and dread, their unfocused fears of their inadequacies and the state of the world in general. I clipped a coupon, in the superman comic I think, to stop my hair receding prematurely. And there was a book coupon I clipped for a book on “How to Develop a Super Power Memory” Only thing I can remember about it is that I left it on a train. Can’t even remember where the train was going too. And when I was in the army, training as a recruit, I sent away for a book on “How to win Friends and Influence people”. Someone in my barrack room stole it from me. I know who it was. It was easy to tell. He became the most popular bloke in the regiment.

They all had money back guarantees. All a scam.

I kept up the dynamic tension isotonic exercises for most of my life. The sticks with pretend weights might have become shopping bags that I pretend are quite heavy, but I still try, now and then. And it still hasn’t worked. True I am no longer a seven-stone weakling. More like a 15-stone lazy old git. Had sand kicked in my face in Torremolinos last year. I wonder if that guarantee is still valid?   “Dear Mr Atlas, kindly return my postal order as I am still getting sand kicked in my face”

The Pleasures of Facebook – A photograph from WWII

I belong to this group on Facebook, Gibraltar Old photos 2 it’s called. It a nostalgia group whose members, mostly from Gibraltar,  post old photographs of life on and around and about the Rock. I lived there once and have many happy and treasured memories upon which I once contributed a piece to the site, some years ago, about being a boy in 1950’s Gibraltar. You can read it here. I still contribute to the site now and then, and to that purpose I was searching google for a film poster of a movie, made in Gibraltar in the early ‘60’s, staring Terry Thomas and called “Operation Snatch”. You need to be a bit careful what you type into google at times!

evacuation-happy-to-be-home
In my search I stumbled across this lovely old photograph the caption of which read “Gibraltar families returning to Gibraltar in 1945 after five years of evacuation during WWII”

I thought it quite an exciting find and duly posted it on the site. I was a little skeptical but the image came from an article by Neville Chipulina, a rather noted Gibraltar historian.

One of the endearing features of the Gibraltar old photos 2 site is that if you post any image of any person in any circumstances at any time over the past one hundred years or so then someone on the sit will know who they are, who their uncles and aunties are and the names of their children and what schools they went to and perhaps even the name of their godmother. It’s a small community on Gib!   So I was anticipating that the families in the photograph would quickly be identified.
Up popped Maurice Valentino who questioned the whole thing saying they don’t look like Gibraltarians at all!  Far too fair in completion. Someone else, Maruchi Golt, suggested they were obviously English families. And no one, no one at all, could identify anyone in the photograph, anyone at all.
Then come Earnest Falquero, one of the stalwarts of the site who referred us all to a post by one Alex Parnay who in turn, confirmed doubts that they were families from Gibraltar and confirmed too that the caption accompanying the photograph was completely wrong. And he disclosed to us the quite astonishing story behind the photograph. They were English families, survivors from a passenger ship torpedoed by German U-Boats!
laconiaresized1RMS Laconica was originally commissioned as an ocean-going luxury passenger ship for the Cunard line. With the outbreak of WWII she was requisitioned by the Admiralty and fitted with eight six inch guns and two three inch guns. She was put to duties as an armed merchant escort ship. Later still she became a troopship and was well known as such in both commercial and military shipping circles. She was deployed ferrying troops to the middle east and carrying prisoners of war back to Blighty. It is quite important to note that. Her military role, unlike that of the Lusitania, made her a completely legitimate target for the U-boats now awaiting her in the Atlantic ocean.
She left the port of Suez loaded with Italian prisoners of war, their Polish guards and many British service families. She steamed down the East coast of Africa, stopping at Durban where more British service families were taken on board, these being families who had escaped from Singapore as the Japanese defeated, overwhelmed and expelled the British from all their colonial possessions in the Far East. She then steamed out into the Atlantic and hundreds of miles to the west she turned North towards the equator and set course for England. She was doing 20 knots and taking a zig zag path to minimise the risk from German submarines.
She was now carrying 463 officers and crew, 80 civilians, 286 British soldiers, 1,793 Italian prisoners and 103 Polish soldiers acting as guards of the prisoners.

It was her smoke that first attracted the attention of U-boat 156.

It was to be a surface attack. In the darkness of the tropical night, at about 10 pm Captain Hartenstein, commander of the U-boat made his calculations as to distance and the time it would take for a torpedo to reach the ship which was now steaming fast and zig zagging at random. He unleashed a torpedo sometime after 10 pm and it struck the Laconia at 10.22. He immediately dived to avoid any possible counter attack. He would have watched from his periscope the explosion as the torpedo found its target below the ship’s waterline. There was no counter attack and he surfaced again and unleashed a second torpedo, this time hitting the forward starboard of the badly listing ship.. It was a successful attack on a known legitimate target and the Captain and his crew celebrated and watched the ship burn and sink. Then they heard the screams of the survivors and became alarmed for they were the screams of women and children.
He dived again and it is clear that for several hours there was a continuous and urgent exchange of signal traffic with Germany, probably on the enigma machines that each U-boat carried. Berlin advised that the Laconia was carrying Italian prisoners of war and ordered that they should attempt to rescue their allies. Hartenstein went well beyond his Berlin Orders. Or the laws of war at sea.

When he again surfaced, his crew began to rescue the civilians as well as the Italians. He took over a hundred survivors into the already crowded submarine, and another hundred or so on the top of the submarine. He collected together some four lifeboats and began to tow them in his wake, passing food and water to the survivors therein. He told Berlin what he was doing and his actions were not only approved by Admiral Donitz, he went further and ordered other submarines to assist Hartenstein in the rescue. And Vichy French forces in North Africa dispatched surface ships to meet the submarines at sea and transfer the survivors.

Red Cross flags were draped on the submarine decks and open signal traffic exchanged with the other boats making clear this was a rescue operation. Open Signals were sent to the British to the same effect, but were ignored, quite deliberately ignored by British forces available in the area and from British bases on the West coast of Africa. Hartenstein rendezvoused with another German Submarine and an Italian submarine and some of his survivors were transferred.laconia-2
He then continued to slowly steam towards another rendezvous with the Vichy French surface ships, his crew’s quarters packed with the civilian survivors, his deck full of even more and still towing four life-boats.

Then came the Americans. They had a secret airbase established on Ascension Ireland and a B-24 bomber was sent out to search for the now missing and lost RMS Laconica. They saw Hartenstein’s submarine, with its red cross flag and its life-boats in tow. And they attacked. Five passes, five bombs.bombing-of-the-laconia They killed over a 100 of the survivors in the lifeboats and Hartenstein was forced to clear the submarine of all remaining survivors and put them in the remaining lifeboats. He cut the tow lines and dived for safety. He kept on board some of the rescued military officers as prisoners of war.
The survivors were now, again, adrift in the Atlantic. But the Vichy French ships were coming and were searching for them and they were rescued again. This time they were taken to Casablanca and interned by the Vichy French who intended to hand them over to the Germans and have them transferred to Germany.
And now history threw its dice again. The survivors had been in internment by the Vichy French for some two months when, in November 1942 the Allies launched Operation Torch. The operation was commanded by General Eisenhower who set up his headquarters in Fortress Gibraltar. Sixty-five thousand Allied troops invaded French north Africa. They were to crush the Vichy French and to expel German influence from the Mediterranean area and advance toward Tunisia.
And the survivors were liberated!
The sources say they were taken by ship to America, for the Americans had provided the main invasion force of North Africa and some of her ships, now empty, had brought the invading troops directly from the American East Coast.
But this group, which Maruchi Golt on the Gibraltar Old Photos 2 site, described as looking “so happy” clearly came to Gibraltar from Casablanca.
They are pictured outside St. Bernard’s Hospital and it is reasonable to assume they had been for a check-up before being transported onwards to England. And of course, as Maruchi Glolt notes, they look so happy! They had survived the Japanese, survived being torpedoed, survived the sea, survived the Americans, survived the sea again and then, capture and internment. They had been rescued twice, once by the very U-boat that had sank their ship. And now they were safe. And on British soil! On Gibraltar. On the Rock. And sure, we can share in their joy and their happiness. Especially can Gibraltarians.
Of course, Facebook did not discover this story. There is nothing original here. The rescue is one of the most famous stories of World War II. There are several books on the incident and documentaries too. And the BBC ran a two-part television film dramatizing the story, written by the legendary Alan Bleasdale. So no one is claiming any Facebook credit for this story. No. What Facebook does, can do, is to bring such stories alive again; to refresh them, recall them, tell them to a new generation. Spark new interest, spread the word. It is one of the great pleasures of Facebook.

Some of those in the photograph are probably still alive. The infant in arms will be in his or her 80’s now. And perhaps some of the younger children still breath. It is certain that the children and the child survivors will be alive. They may even be on Facebook…….

Note: 1113 survivors were rescued. 1619 perished in the torpedo attack, most of them Italian prisoners of war, still locked in the hold as the ship was struck.

Note:  Capt Hartenstein’s submarine U-156,  some six months later was attacked by American aircraft and sank.  there were no survivors.

Pinterest could be for you…

PINTEREST COULD BE FOR YOU…

It’s about images. But it’s much more than just images. For example, if you “pin” and image to the site it is displayed on a sort of board with several option buttons. Like this:. typical-pinX You have probably “saved” the image to the board from some website or other you have visited and found interesting. Once saved, you fill in the caption space on the board. The option buttons include a “visit” button, and perhaps a “read” button. If one of your followers, or someone browsing Pinterest boards clicks on the “read” or “visit#” button they will be taken to the original article or website from which you saved the image. Here’s  a link to another  example of what a typical saved image looks like. http://bit.ly/2eGFi79   Try pressing the visit button and it should take you to a full article on the subject of the pin.. So you can see that this has great potential for saving and displaying not just images, but whole stories, articles, websites and background information related to your saved image. And it is soooo neat!

And it’s the principal reason that Pinterest has seen such saw incredible growth since its launch in 2013, now surpassing email as a sharing medium, and beginning to outpace Facebook.
Once you set up an account, which is free (and without any hidden or subsequent charges whatsoever) then you are prompted to create a pin board of images. First thing to do is browse or cruise existing boards, there are simply millions of them. Every conceivable subject under the sun will have a board dedicated to its author’s favorite subject. You like cats? Books? Philosophy? Survival techniques? Fly fishing? Knitting? Recipes? Stories and images from the holocaust? World War 1 and 2 ? photography?

I defy you to think of a subject not covered by someone’s pin board be it designing a bathroom, decorating a shed, understanding cameras or being in love with Van Gogh. It is endless,
My own interests centre on, but are not confined to, photography. Two sites I “follow” and steal images from are on “Combat Photographers” http://bit.ly/2eTdfSA and “Military Photographers” http://bit.ly/2e8n9hT     The difference between the two seems to be that the Military board deals only with photographers in uniform, those who serve with cameras whereas the Combat board includes embedded civilian photographers and those who work for newspapers and magazines and freelance their way with soldiers in action.
I recently opened a new “board” to display the odd bits of writing from my blog. In fact, I have always been a bit disappointed the way blog sites display your work, the contents pages are difficult and far too boring to navigate. On Pinterest, each piece of my writing gets a separate “pin” and the “visit” or “read” button takes you to the blog article itself. It’s a much more interesting way to display the contents of your blog and you also get a lot more hits! See for yourself: http://bit.ly/2fhaWdu
Another option button that appears with each image, usually at the top of the pinned image, is the heart symbol which you press if you like the image or pin. This will automatically save the image to an automatically created “likes” board on your own pin board, so you can enjoy it at your leisure.

It should come with a strong caveat and warning. For Pinterest, as well as having such an abundance of diverse topics to explore also has a fair share of porn pins. They are separate from the subjects you might enjoy and explore with your family, but they are there.

They cater for any type of fetish and taste in porn you could possibly think of, and for every degree of sexual orientation. There are pages of pretty girls, fashion pages, lingerie pages, racy pages, raunchy pages and hard core porn images and giffs. If you happen to click “like” then the whole world, or at least everyone who follows you, will instantly know that you prefer Wagnerian breasted Bavarian bar maids with steins of frothy Bavarian beer and dressed in jackboots, leather knickers and perhaps a Sam Browne belt. I hasten to add that I don’t know if such an image is on Pinterest and this is merely an illustrative warning and has no connection with my own interests or preferences. Although I would admit to being partial to Bavarian beer and I am rather fond of Wagner. So be careful what you “like”
Another feature of your pin board is the ability to create “secret” pins saved to a secret board. When created, no one else can see the board’s contents except you. Its use is obvious. If, for example, you are a very macho aggressive heterosexual with boards full of survival kit and equipment, perhaps boards of guns and knives and boards of  unarmed combat techniques, but you don’t want people to know that you secretly collect knitting patterns, then the secret option is for you. I have a secret board myself. I use it to keep my pictures of Bavarian beer.
You can follow other people’s boards that you might find interesting. And of course, they can follow your boards. I follow the boards of several photographers who use Pinterest to display their work, wedding photographers, aerial photographers, portrait photographers. And I recently “saved” a pin from a survival site, on how to make a smoke bomb from a ping pong ball, some silver foil and a biro. Don’t ask me why. It may be that sometime in the future I just might need to make a smoke bomb, who knows? It seemed a good idea at the time. And I can always delete it later
I prefer to view Pinterest on a tablet. I have a Surface tablet and find that I can enlarge the images on the tablet with my finger and thumb but cannot enlarge the images on my phone laptop or PC. That, so far, is my only disappointment with the site.
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The Alzheimer’s Carer

This is Stephen Gerard Scullion.  He is  a friend of mine.  A Facebook friend.   I have never met him, never had a coffee with him, never spoken to him.  All I know of him has been gathered from the posts he makes on his timeline.  He posted this image, only a few days ago,  on that very timeline.

Alzheimers  2

The Alzheimer’s Carer

Just look at  him in this daft silly image.   On the surface it is just that, daft and silly and those who know him made comments and observations about “Dads Army”, “It ain’t half hot Mum” and Benny Hill.

But I think it is a most beautiful and poignant image and I shall tell you why.

He is ex Royal Navy and retains a firm affection for the service.  He has an ex-serviceman’s sense of humour and indeed I started to follow him because someone shared with me one of his very funny posts.   They can be fairly politically incorrect at times and are all the more glorious for being so.   He also, occasionally posts images of beautiful women in bikini’s,  for no other reason than that they are beautiful, and that the women know they are beautiful and wish to share their beauty.  I rather like those occasional postings.

He lives in Felling which is in Gateshead, Newcastle, County Durham and he has a fine sense of the importance of local history and is for ever banging on about the history of the old Felling mining community to which his parents and grandparents belonged.   It gives to him, I think, his political values.  Another feature which becomes obvious if you make him a Facebook friend is his absolute abhorrence of any form of cruelty to animals and he has a fairly typical Facebook addiction of posting cute pictures of animals and funny pictures of animals but also, quite often, pictures of animals in distress as a result of cruelty and abuse.

But this image has little or nothing to do with such matters.   He belongs, and only mentioned it almost by accident, to a group of volunteers in Felling who visit care homes for those suffering from Alzheimer’s.  They dress up and perform and do silly things for the Alzheimer residents.   This is him, in his daft army uniform, ready to perform for the residents of the Marigold Court care home, you know, the one,  up by the ASDA store, near the Felling byepass.

Why?   The residents, who live in a condition of scattered confusion, are lonely, isolated, alienated and desperate, they won’t know who the volunteers  are, probably won’t know what they are doing and almost certainly will be unsure what is going on.    The best they can hope for, these volunteers, is perhaps a flicker of a smile, a spark of something remembered, a raised hand, a pointed finger, maybe nothing..   Perhaps some of the residents were soldiers once, or were married to soldiers or had sons and daughters who were soldiers, or just remember “Dads Army” on the tele.

It is hard work. Beautiful work, completely unselfish work, and without reward, or recognition.

And it makes this image a poignant and beautiful portrait.  It reminds us all, for all out  failures, doubts, insecurity’s and problems, with debt or relationships or  work, how good it is possible to be.  Of course it’s not technically, a great photograph. Probably taken on a phone and if that fierce man on Master Photographers, him with the blue glasses saw it, he would certainly be angry at the photographer.  But  it touches my heart.

In Westminster, some very rich very selfish person, who might have given money to the Tory party, will be honoured by the Queen.  Perhaps even ennobled so that they can have a say on the legislation which will govern the resources provided for the Alzheimer’s patients in Felling, County Durham.

I know who I would prefer to honour.

Stephen’s Facebookpage does not carry his own photograph.  Instead there is a photograph of his mother.   She suffers now form Alzheimer’s.

Coffee Morning talk on the Roger Casement Painting.

 

The Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, holds a series of coffee morning talks on the paintings on exhibition in the gallery.  Such talks are for about 40 minutes, followed by questions and then to coffee for a continuing discussion.   This was my talk, on the 22nd June 2016,  given before the great canvas (10′ x 8′) that is Sir John Lavery’s “High Court – The Appeal of Sir Roger Casement”  The painting was on exhibition as part of the 1916 centenary celebrations,  surrounded by important paintings of many of the  characters who appear in the painting itself.High Treason by Lavery

May I welcome you to the Royal Courts of Justice, and in particular, here, to the Court of Criminal Appeal.   It is, as you can see from the clock upon the oak paneled wall, it is , almost High noon. The date is 19th of July 1916.

The case has been called on, and the prisoner is in the dock, guarded.  There is standing room only and almost every barrister in the Royal Courts building is here, for this is the most important state trial of the 20th century. And all of London wants to see it.

The King against Casement.

Mr. Justice Darling is presiding.  Look at him, he’s such a handsome fellow is he not?,  in his scarlet robes, see how he commands his courtroom, stern, straight backed, he has been caught in  noble profile and all eyes in the court are upon him.

You see there are two perspectives in this painting, the internal perspective, where everyone’s attention is upon Judge Darling, with most eyes in the court are drawn towards him, and then there is an external perspective, our view, where the central focus is upon, right in the middle of this huge canvas, Mr. Casement, seated in the barred dock.   Very clever chap that Lavery.   His client, the man who invited him to do the painting, Darling, has of course, to be portrayed rather prominently, but Lavery also, I think it is obvious, has an empathy with the prisoner, so he gives us them both.  The English judge and the Irish  felon.

I should tell you that Darling was rather a vain man.  He had his portrait painted several times, look at the one behind you, painted by Charles Wellington Furse, a very expensive portrait artist indeed, painted when Darling was but a simple junior counsel.darling by birch Not many barristers commission their portraits as junior counsel. Few would wish to announce such ambition, and fewer still would be able to afford the likes of Charles William Furse.  There is another one of him, painted when he was first appointed to the bench, by Henry, the outstanding Scottish portrait artist, one of the Glasgow boys, which is really rather wonderful.  I will give you the web reference at the end and you will see for yourself.*   Oh he was handsome fellow was Darling. And he knew it!  There are several other portraits of him by Grenville Eves, even by Winston Churchill, as well as several caricatures completed for Vanity magazine.

Lavery had painted him once before.  A few years earlier, wearing a black cap and pronouncing a sentence of death.  Not deemed by many of his colleagues in the law to be in very good taste.blackcap   He’s a wit, can be very funny at times, and he’s a poet, written a rather good volume of poetry.   He was considered once, oh a few years after this trial, for the post of Lord Chief Justice of England.   Didn’t get the job.   This chap sitting next to him got it instead.  Judge A. T. Lawrence.   Lawrence was 78 years old by then.  Darling was 73.  He would always say, he would always tell you, that he didn’t get the job because he was too young.

He was a Unionist, no doubt about that at all.    As a member of parliament he always voted against Home Rule.  He is a great friend of Carson.  Thinks Carson is most unlike most Irishmen, says that unlike the rest of you Irish, Carson is incapable of speaking balderdash.   He invited Carson you know, to join his chambers when Carson left the Irish Bar to transfer to the English Bar.   They were in chambers together as K.C.’s when Carson took the brief for the Marquis of Queensbury.

He sits with his four colleagues, first one here is Judge Scrutton, He has three sons fighting in the Great War, two are on the Somme and one in the Balkans, up near Thessalonica. So   you can well imagine that he may have some reservations about a prisoner who was suborning captured crown’s soldiers in Germany.  One of his sons will be killed within a month of the trial.   Then there’s Judge Bray, Darling of course , Lawrence we have already mentioned, and on the end Judge Atkin.

Oh Judge Atkin!

He is probably the most famous judge in the whole of the common law world, You won’t find a student of law, a solicitor or barrister or judge or judicial assistant who doesn’t know of Atkin and who will, at some stage of their careers, have quoted the judge.   He almost invented the law of negligence and I could not possibly exaggerate his importance to the law.  He is to the law as Arthur is to Guinness.   What a pity Lavery has not captured more of him, but of course at the time of the trial he was not quite so famous as he would subsequently become.

Look here’s another famous fellow.  The paintings full of them.  F.E. Smith.  Carson’s galloper, Attorney General, chief prosecuting counsel and a deep deep unionist; from an Orange constituency in Liverpool, Birkenhead.  Even his birthday falls on the 12th July.  A bit of a gun-runner himself and certainly young Winston Churchill, an up and coming star of the political stage, has described some of his speeches in favour of unionism as being fairly close to promoting naked revolution.  Good judge of character that Churchill.  Keep an eye on him.

Showing him the law-book is one of the prosecution junior counsel, Mr. Bodkin.  Another famous character, banned Ulysses when he became Director of Public Prosecutions, couldn’t bear Molly’s soliquity.

He’s caught the Irish fairly, has Lavery.  Here’s Gavan Duffy.  Oh what a hero he is!   He was a solicitor in London, prosperous, going places, when he was asked to take on Casement.  His partners were not at all  happy about it.

You want to represent a traitor?  In the middle of this awful bloody war?   Make your mind up Mr. Gavan Duffy, stay with the practice or represent your Irish traitor, but you can’t do both.

To his eternal glory, as both an Irishman and as a lawyer, he chose his client.   Makes him a bit of a legal hero to us lawyers.   His dad was a bit of a character too.  Ran the Nation newspaper here in Dublin, a fine constitutional nationalist he was, tried with Daniel O’Connell once, major figure in the Tenant League, was in the Ballingary Rising of  1848       Gone to Australia now.  Become Sir Charles Gavan Duffy over there, very noble, bit less of a nationalist over there?  He is now Governor General of Victoria; his other son will become Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia.  This Gavan Duffy, our Gavan Duffy, will become, in the new Irish state, President of the High Court of Ireland.   This is just stuffed full of important historical figures in the life of Ireland and England.

There are three women on the solicitor’s bench.  Quite unusual for 1916.  One is Gavan Duffy’s wife, taking notes, and the other Casement’s cousin Gertrude Bannister. She is devoted to her Roger, look at her glancing up at Roger in the dock.  Are they exchanging a glance?   I think they are.  Lavery knew they were devoted to one another and he has put it into the painting.  The other woman is Alice Stopford Green, eminent nationalist historian, helped Casement organise the Howth gun-running.   Did you notice, all the ladies are wearing hats.   Quite proper for 1916 I think.

You know there is a full transcript of this trial.  Great read.  That chap standing at the end of the bench there, he’s the court reporter, taking it all down in shorthand.  It’s his transcript.

On his feet is the Dublin barrister Sgt Sullivan.   Now he happens to be married to Gavan Duffy’s sister and you may think that Irish lawyers tend to keep business in the family, I can’t possibly comment on that, but there you are.   In fact, Sullivan was one of the leading lights of the Irish Bar.   A Sgt was a special breed of Senior Counsel, Kings Counsel as they were known then.   He was destined for the bench in Ireland and would have made it if the Rising and the War of Independence hadn’t got in the way.   Their only distinguishing mark, in court regalia, was a small patch of black silk set into the top of the wig.   In England he was not a Kings Counsel.  He was only a Junior counsel and therefore he is standing in the second row because the first row is reserved for Kings Counsel, Senior Counsel we now call them.  Still is to this day.

At the trial proper, this is the appeal remember.  Casement has already been found guilty of high treason and has already been sentenced to death, he was so sentenced by the Lord Chief Justice of England Ruffas Issaccs, or Lord Reading as he was known.   At the trial, Sullivan had been summing up to the jury.   The artist has painted this scene from the Jury Box, so he would have been addressing us, we would be the jury.  He made, what in my view is a really excellent summing up speech making the best of the limited material he had.   In fact, a bit too much.  He sought to persuade the jury that the Irish were arming themselves for fear that the already heavily armed unionists would seek to undermine any parliamentary decision to grant home rule.  He was interrupted!  There was a protest, quite sharp, from both F.E. Smith and the Lord Chief Justice, who said he could not run that argument, because no evidence to that effect had been heard.   You can only address the jury on evidence actually given in the trial.

He realised they were right and had to apologise –  in so doing he lost the thread of his argument.   It was a rather deferential apology, perhaps he thought it might affect his future plans to transfer to the English Bar.  Any way he stumbled, and could not regain his composure.  He collapsed into his seat saying “My Lord I cannot go on”.    Of course the trial was adjourned immediately.  Next day he was still not recovered and the closing speech had to be concluded by his Junior Counsel, here, Artemous Jones.

I don’t think the prisoner was very impressed.

One of the reasons Sullivan was employed for the trial, so it is said, is because no English barrister, Kings Counsel, would take it on.   It was the middle of a very gruesome war, Verdun, the Somme, casualties were appalling and Casement was charged with High Treason, in time of war.  But in fact there was no difficulty getting English junior counsel and I don’t quite understand, or accept that no English KC would take the case.   In fact, there are two English junior counsel on the defence.  One, Morgan BL, is in fact a brigadier in the Kings Army, and a professor of law.  He wasn’t afraid to take on the case, even though a serving soldier.   The other, here is Artemous Jones, nor was he afraid and nor did any of their careers suffer for representing a traitor.   Morgan ended up a Brigadier General and an advisor to Churchill in WW2, and he was at Nuremberg.   Jones became a judge.    He is rather more famous as a litigant than as a counsel.   It’s his name you know.   A newspaper reporter had filed a story from the south of France, he was reporting on the English taking holidays in France, and as reporters sometimes do he wrote something like “And there is Artemous Jones with a lady who is not his wife” Of course he thought, quite reasonably, that it was quite impossible that anyone could possibly be called Artemous Jones.  But he was wrong and Jones sued.   It’s still a leading case in libel law and often cited in court, both in Ireland and in England.

And so finally in this all too brief review, we come to Roger Casement.  The much smaller version of this painting, over there, is the one that W.B. Yeats saw when he visited this gallery in 1937.  He wrote a poem about it “The Municipal gallery re-visited” and wrote of “Casement upon trial, half hidden by the bars” But he is not really hidden.  For us, outside the larger painting, he is in fact the primary focus.

Four days the trial had lasted, and now he sits in the dock for the three days of the appeal.  Was there a comma in that ancient 1351 Statute, in that handwritten Norman French parchment?  Did it mean, that comma, that treason was confined to acts within the realm, and therefore acts abroad, in Germany, did not count.    Not so held the court.  As they had held before, just a few brief years ago, for another Irishman tried for treason, Colonel Lynch, who had commanded an Irish Brigade against the British, abroad, in the Boer war.

Three scarlet robed judges at trial had dismissed the argument. Now five scarlet robed judges at the appeal would again dismiss the argument.   Why didn’t they go to the House of Lords for a father appeal?   Well they wanted to, but to do so required the consent of the A.G.   F.E. Smith.   He was of the view that between the trial and the appeal eight of the most senior judges in the land had unanimously rejected the argument and that was enough.

So Casement will leave the dock, this court, for the gallows at Pentonville.  Only appeals for clemency might now save him.   And why not, for he was an international figure, he had friends in High places, in governments, writers, politicians, diplomats, ambassadors, he was active in anti-slavery movements across the globe he had a vast international network of friends and supporters.   I cannot stress to you how well known he was in humanitarian circles.  Everyone would have, should have, signed petitions.  Even Bono would have signed.

But now the Government, the cabinet, the secret service, will launch their miserable, malicious, nasty, unprincipled black campaign to defeat the pleas for clemency and to dissuade his friends from signing or joining such appeals.   It was the diaries, the so called black diaries, they circulated the most salacious pages.  To Bishops, ambassadors, governments, in the clubs of London. “Look at this, he’s a homosexual, he’s a disgusting pervert, tell your friends.  Don’t sign any petitions.”   They undoubtedly added a fatal weight to the gallows drop at Pentonville prison.

And it meant, that this painting, conceived as a tribute to the English Law, and to Darling, lost its integrity, as did the trial itself.   What had been done meant no one wanted this picture.  It was left on Lavery’s hands; he couldn’t sell it even though he tried. He ended up leaving it in his will.  Interestingly he did not leave it to Ireland.   His first choice was the National Gallery in London.   They didn’t want it; they had already declined to buy it a few years earlier.   His next choice was the Royal Courts of Justice, and only if they refused it did he then think that it should go to Ireland.   An indication I suggest, that he always saw this painting as being a celebration of the English law and not a celebration of Casement, or as an Irish subject.

The Royal Courts of Justice took it, didn’t know what to do with it, wouldn’t hang it in a public place. Put it in a basement office where no one saw it and no one cared about it and its importance quickly faded and was forgotten.

Sullivan it was who rescued it from obscurity.  He retired here to Dublin, lived in Orwell Road, became a bencher of the Kings Inns and wrote to the Lord Chief Justice of England to try and buy it.   They wouldn’t sell, even though they didn’t like and didn’t particularly want it, but the correspondence is interesting.  The Lord Chief Justice writes to the Lord Chancellor.  “We could let the King’s Inns have it on loan, and forget to ask for it back…”

And so here it is. Now a tribute to Casement and not to the English Law.   Still owned by the British, part of their government art collection, but here on loan, permanent loan.   And so far, I am pleased to tell you, they have not asked for it back.

  I might before be finishing urge you, should you have found this of any interest, to go to buy the exhibition catalogue and take it with you to the Royal Courts of Justice and visit the courtroom, this courtroom, wherein Casement was sentenced to death.   It is courtroom 36 in the West Green wing of the Royal Courts of Justice, take with you if you do, the catalogue, which has a copy of this great painting, and you will observe and compare, with the hairs rising on the back of your neck, how little the courtroom has changed this hundred years or so;  the oak panelling still encloses the space, the bookcase is still there, probably with the same books within it as were there in 1916, the clock still ticks on the wall;   you will be aware you are in a place of death, a battleground of Irish history,and perhaps, a place of pilgrimage

Shall we go to coffee?

 

 

Mr. Justice Darling in 1916, by Reginald Grenville Eves

Mr. Justice Darling in 1916, by Reginald Grenville Eves

Mr. Justice Darling by Henry

Mr. Justice Darling by Henry

darling by churchill

Darling by Winston Churchill

Four Courts in the Rising

This article was originally published in the Bar Review, April 2016

 

four courts

Apart from the great magazine in Phoenix Park, most of the buildings seized by the rebel forces during Easter week 1916 were not defended buildings, in the sense that Dublin or Ireland was under threat or that its public buildings required that they be defended by armed men.    Dublin was generally at peace in the weeks before that Easter.  It was a holiday weekend and even up at the castle there was very little in the way of an occupying armed force, patrolling, on high alert for insurrection.    The castle was hardly defended at all, with virtually no soldiers in residence, and a routine bank holiday weekend guard of soldiers,  carrying weapons but without ammunition.    The only man killed there was the unarmed policeman on the gate, Constable O’Brien of the Dublin Metropolitan Police, and it seems clear that it was a lack of audacity, discipline and daring that prevented the rebel force from successfully seizing the very centre of British Rule in Ireland.

At the Four Courts there was another DMP constable on duty. At the Judge’s gate on Chancery Place.  The Four Courts rebels were more organised and disciplined than those at the castle and did not find it necessary to shoot the unarmed constable, he was, after all, like O’Brien, more of a caretaker than a guard.  He quickly agreed to hand over the keys, being well persuaded by the advocacy of a gun barrel.   And suddenly, without a shot being fired, the rebels had the Four Courts and were in.

It is a vast building, a complex of buildings, a campus as the courts service now refer to it, with multiple entry points each of which had to be barricaded.  Commandant Daly, the rebel commander had little enough in the way of men.  daly 2 An anticipated force of 400 rebels was down to about 130 although many more would join as it became clear during the week, that the Rising had begun.   He was required to spread his men rather thinly.  In addition to holding the Four Courts, with which we are principally interested in, he had also to garrison strong points over a wide area, Church Street, North King Street, the Jameson Distillery and up at the Broadstone railway station.   Barricades had to be erected to slow any British advance, three on Church Street alone, and more on Brunswick Street and North King Street and numerous side streets.  Some of these barricades were fourteen foot high.   First Aid posts were established in the Father Mathew Hall and in the Four courts itself.  And he sent a team up to seize the Linen Hall barracks, near Kings Inns which they did with some ease, and burnt the barracks to the ground, marching captured soldiers, mostly pay corps clerks, to captivity.  The barracks burned for the whole week of the Rising, providing a dramatic fiery background to the unfolding events.  Some of the fiercest fighting of the Rising would occur around his satellite strong points, particularly on North King Street.   But the Four Courts itself would also see plenty of action.

At around lunchtime on Easter Monday (24th April) a British army horse drawn convoy of munitions, escorted by some 50 mounted lancers, came trotting along the North quays making their way towards the magazine at Phoenix Park.  As they came abreast of the Church Street junction they came under fire from one of Commandant Daly’s barricades, the leading lancer fell dead and several others were wounded and dropped from their horses, but the lancers were disciplined professional troops and they managed to wheel the two heavily laden wagons and gallop for cover into the side streets, coming under fire as they did from the rooftop and windows of the Four Courts.   More volunteers dashed out of the Judge’s yard, up Chancery Place and opened fire on the retreating lancers.    They wheeled into Charles Street and those that could made a forced entry into the rear of the Medical Mission building, managing to carry the munitions into the Mission and turning over the empty wagons to form a barricade.  Wounded lancers, clinging to their houses ran wildly through the streets.   One lancer, isolated from his comrades,  found himself galloping up Church Street towards another of the Daly’s barricades, lowering his lance he charged in a valiant if suicidal  attempt to break through.   He was shot dead in his saddle, by Commandant Daly himself, who took careful aim using the shoulder of a comrade to steady the shot.   The lance was taken from the trooper’s body and with a tricolour attached it was wedged in triumph into a manhole at the junction of Church Street with North King Street.   Other lancers were captured and taken prisoner, some taken to the Father Mathew Hall and others into the Four Courts itself.   Yet more of the lancers had taken refuge in the Bridewell police station immediately behind the Four Courts.   The locks to the station were shot open and two more lancers captured and taken to the Four Courts.  They also found some two dozen Dublin Metropolitan constables hiding in the basement and they too were taken into captivity.  A couple of lucky prisoners in the cells were let go.

Inside the Medical Mission the lancers barricaded themselves in and prepared to fight.  Its windows, to the front of the building, overlooked the Chancery Place entrance to the Four Courts and an intense gun battle developed between the lancers in the Mission and the rebels in the courts.    The Cavalry officer in command in the Mission was shot dead in the ferocious exchange and one of the Four Courts volunteers, running out of the Judge’s yard and attempting to lob an incendiary  grenade into the Mission fell, badly wounded on Chancery Place,, shot by a lancer from one of the windows of the Medical Mission.

Today, if you were to stand outside the Judge’s gate and look towards the Mission building you can see that the major bullet damage to the upper floor has been repaired with a sort of half-white filler/cement, leaving the red brick work looking, wounded, as if it were wearing plasters.  Up close you can see that almost every brick in the building has gunshot damage, bearing eloquent witness to the ferocity of the fighting.   damage 1916There is no corresponding damage from the intense gunfire on the walls of the Four Courts as all traces of the battle would have been obliterated when the building was destroyed in 1922.   However the photograph of the corner of the Four Courts which shows the damage inflicted by British Artillery firing from Essex Street also shows heavy gunshot damage, some of  which probably came from the Medical Mission gunfight.

The Four Courts was now under fire from virtually all directions.  There were British soldiers in the church towers and on the roofs of high buildings across the Liffey, there was a Lewis machine gun on a tower in the Jervis Hospital, and soldiers constantly infiltrating across the Liffey bridges into the maze of  side streets.    An 18 pounder artillery piece was sited on Essex Street, near the Sunlight building, and opened fire on Chancery Lane corner of the building.   Fortunately they only fired some four or five rounds although it is clear that had they so wished they could have systematically reduced the building to rubble.

From the direction of Smithfield Royal Dublin Fusiliers were making their way towards the Church Street side of the courts complex, sweeping the western side of the buildings with machine gun and rifle fire.  Dubliners firing on Dubliners. You can still see some of the bullet damage to the lower stone walls of the building, as you walk up Church Street.

From inside and on the roof of what is now the Court of Appeal, and was then the Registry building, rebel volunteers returned fire on the Dublin Fusiliers.   It was here that   Volunteer Lt. Thomas Allen was mortally wounded on the staircase landing.  There are conflicting reports in the Bureau of Military History as to how he was hit.   Volunteer Thomas Smart claimed he was caught in a burst of machine gun fire and there are certainly still, this hundred years later, the evidence of dark stiches of machine gun damage across the upper windows of the Court of Appeal building.   They can be seen most clearly from the overlooking windows of Court 18 in Áras Uí Dhálaigh.    Volunteer Sean Kennedy has him in a room on the first floor landing, behind a barricaded window and being caught by a sniper’s bullet that went through the elbow of another volunteer before striking Allen in the left breast.    Both are agreed he was mortally wounded and was taken by stretcher to the Richmond Hospital where he died of his wounds.

As the battle raged in North King Street and Church Street, the Four Courts became a place to where battle weary volunteers might get some respite, a hot meal prepared by members of Cumann Na mBan, soup or tea, a bed, some much needed sleep.   There was a kitchen established in the basement, exactly where is not certain but  it was towards the back of the building opposite the Bridewell police station, perhaps in the solicitors building where their café still has that old black range on the back wall.    They were feeding up to 70 volunteers and a whole range of captured prisoners.   There was a first-aid post, also manned by Cuman mBan that treated their wounds.  Seriously injured men would be carried by stretcher to the Richmond Hospital.

One volunteer, records sleeping in the law library, using a law book for a pillow, one might hope that he found it more appropriate to lay his head upon a volume of the Irish Reports rather than the All England reports.     Dr. Bridget Lyons Thornton, of the Cumann na mBan, working as a nurse in the Four Courts, recalled falling asleep wrapped in the scarlet and ermine of judge’s robes.

The most important office in the Four Courts was probably that of the Lord Chancellor of Ireland., Sir John Ross.  His office was forced open but the rebels inflicted no damage, leaving alone his papers his wigs and his gowns.  He recalled sitting in his garden at Oatlands, (now Oatlands College) in the spring sunshine reading Plutarch and listening, now and then, to the distant sound of machine guns and cannon.

Commandant Daly spent most of the Easter week up at the Father Mathew Hall, but he was constantly going round the outposts and coming back to the Four Courts.  In effective command in the building was Frank Fahy.   He was joined, later in the week by his wife, a member of Cumann na mBan, after she had firstly placed the family cat and canary with a sympathetic neighbour.

After the surrender some nineteen men of the garrison were tried by court-martial and sentenced to death.   All the sentences were commuted to penal servitude except that of Daly.    His court martial, on May 3rd, lasted just a few minutes, he had no counsel and no solicitor.  He was found guilty and shot by firing squad early the next morning the 4th May.

For further reading on the role of the Four Courts in the Rising read Paul O’Brien’s book: Crossfire – The battle of the Four Courts 1916, published by New Ireland Press.